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Generic Prolixin - Inositol Overdose

This page contains links to eMedTV Mental Health Articles containing information on subjects from Generic Prolixin to Inositol Overdose. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
Favorite Articles
Descriptions of Articles
  • Generic Prolixin
    Prolixin is only available as a generic because the brand-name version is no longer manufactured. This eMedTV segment describes the various versions of generic Prolixin that are available, as well as the different strengths of the medicine.
  • Generic Revia
    You can get a generic Revia (naltrexone) product. This portion of the eMedTV library discusses whether these products are as good as the brand-name version of Revia. It also covers available strengths and lists the manufacturers of these products.
  • Generic Serzone
    Currently, Serzone is only available in generic form. This part of the eMedTV library offers information on the drug companies that manufacture generic Serzone tablets and lists the various strengths available for the generic drug.
  • Generic Surmontil
    Generic Surmontil is available in two strengths (25 mg and 50 mg) and is manufactured by Actavis USA. This eMedTV page describes generic Surmontil in more detail and explains how it compares to brand-name Surmontil.
  • Generic Thorazine
    While brand-name Thorazine is no longer being produced, generic Thorazine is still available. This page on the eMedTV site lists the various strengths of generic Thorazine that are available, as well as the companies that manufacture the medicine.
  • Generic Vivactil
    There are currently two strengths of generic Vivactil available. This article from the eMedTV archives talks more about the generic versions of Vivactil, including information on how they compare to the brand-name drug.
  • Generic Vivitrol
    As this eMedTV page explains, no generic Vivitrol (naltrexone injection) is available. This page offers more details and talks about when generic forms of the medication might be available. It also explains whether Revia and Vivitrol are the same drug.
  • Generic Xanax XR
    This eMedTV segment explains that generic Xanax XR is currently available in several different strengths. This page also describes how the FDA has assigned an "AB" rating to generic Xanax XR, meaning it is equivalent to the brand-name medication.
  • Gensang
    Ginseng is a supplement commonly used for stimulating the immune system and improving mental function. This eMedTV page lists other benefits of ginseng and explores the effectiveness of the supplement. Gensang is a common misspelling of ginseng.
  • Genseng
    Ginseng supplements are often used for improving mental function and memory. This eMedTV resource describes some of the other possible benefits of ginseng and explores its effectiveness. Genseng is a common misspelling of ginseng.
  • Gensing
    Ginseng is an herbal supplement used for stimulating the immune system and improving mental functioning. This eMedTV Web page explores other possible benefits and lists a few potential side effects. Gensing is a common misspelling of ginseng.
  • Ginisang
    People often take ginseng to improve mental functioning and overall mental health. This eMedTV page describes the effects of ginseng, explores its effectiveness, and lists some of its possible side effects. Ginisang is a common misspelling of ginseng.
  • Ginsang
    Ginseng is believed to stimulate the immune system and improve mental health and functioning. This eMedTV segment explores the effects of ginseng and explains what side effects may occur with the supplement. Ginsang is a common misspelling of ginseng.
  • Ginseng
    Ginseng is an herbal supplement often used to enhance memory and mental function. This page on the eMedTV Web site discusses some of the benefits of ginseng, explains how it works, and explores the safety and effectiveness of these products.
  • Ginseng and Breastfeeding
    Very little information is currently available about the use of ginseng in nursing women. This eMedTV article offers more information on ginseng and breastfeeding, and explains whether the supplement appears to be safe for breastfeeding women.
  • Ginseng and Pregnancy Information
    In general, pregnant women should avoid ginseng, especially during the first trimester. This eMedTV resource provides more information on ginseng and pregnancy, and explains what problems may occur if the supplement is used by pregnant women.
  • Ginseng Dosage
    Although there is no standard ginseng dosage, 200 mg daily appears to be a reasonable dose. This part of the eMedTV Web site provides more information on ginseng dosing and offers tips for finding a reliable manufacturer for ginseng supplements.
  • Ginseng Drug Interactions
    Diabetes medications and blood-thinning medicines could cause ginseng drug interactions. This eMedTV Web page lists other drugs that may interact with ginseng supplements and describes the potential problems that may occur with these interactions.
  • Ginseng Overdose
    Heart palpitations, low blood sugar, and mania are possible symptoms of a ginseng overdose. This eMedTV resource explores other potential effects of an overdose and describes the steps that may be taken to treat an overdose of ginseng supplements.
  • Ginseng Root Supplement Info
    As this eMedTV segment explains, people take ginseng for many uses, such as for stimulating the immune system. This article provides more information on using ginseng root and includes a link to more details on this supplement.
  • Ginseng Safety
    Ginseng may theoretically decrease your ability to form blood clots. This eMedTV article lists other side effects or problems that may occur with ginseng. Safety warnings and precautions on who may not be able to take ginseng safely are also included.
  • Ginsing
    Ginseng is a popular herbal supplement used for improving mental functioning and overall mental health. This eMedTV segment covers other benefits of the supplement and lists possible side effects that may occur. Ginsing is a common misspelling of ginseng.
  • Glutamin
    Glutamine is an amino acid that is found in many foods and available as dietary supplements. This eMedTV segment discusses possible glutamine benefits and explores the effectiveness of the supplement. Glutamin is a common misspelling of glutamine.
  • Glutamine
    Glutamine is a non-essential amino acid that is sometimes used in dietary supplements. This eMedTV segment covers some of the possible benefits of glutamine, discusses its effectiveness, and explores the safety of supplementation.
  • Glutamine and Breastfeeding
    It is generally considered a good idea to avoid glutamine (L-glutamine) supplements while breastfeeding. This eMedTV resource offers a more in-depth look at glutamine and breastfeeding, and explains whether the drug is safe for breastfeeding women.
  • Glutamine and Pregnancy
    Glutamine (L-glutamine) supplements may not be safe for use during pregnancy. This portion of the eMedTV site provides more information on glutamine and pregnancy, and explains why dietary supplements may not be safe for pregnant women.
  • Glutamine Dosage
    A standard glutamine dosage has not been established yet. This article from the eMedTV archives discusses glutamine dosing in more detail and offers information on how to best determine a safe and effective glutamine dosage.
  • Glutamine Drug Interactions
    Lactulose, seizure medications, and chemotherapy medicines may cause negative glutamine drug interactions. This eMedTV article further explains what may happen when these products interact with glutamine supplementation.
  • Glutamine Overdose
    It is currently not known exactly what to expect with a glutamine (L-glutamine) overdose. This eMedTV Web page explores some of the potential effects of a glutamine overdose and explains what treatment options are available.
  • Glutamine Side Effects
    Studies have reported no significant side effects with glutamine supplementation. This page from the eMedTV Web site describes some of the problems that have been reported with the supplement and lists theoretical side effects to be aware of.
  • Glutamine Supplement Information
    Glutamine is often taken for insomnia, depression, and other conditions -- but does it work? This eMedTV article presents a brief overview of these supplements, with information on what to discuss with your healthcare provider.
  • Glutemine
    Glutamine is a non-essential amino acid that is available in the form of dietary supplements. This eMedTV article describes glutamine in more detail and lists possible benefits of the supplement. Glutemine is a common misspelling of glutamine.
  • Glutimine
    Glutamine is an amino acid that is often found in various foods and dietary supplements. This eMedTV page describes the effects of glutamine and explains when glutamine supplementation may be beneficial. Glutimine is a common misspelling of glutamine.
  • Glutomine
    Glutamine is an amino acid that is available as a dietary supplement. This eMedTV resource describes the other sources for glutamine and lists some of the benefits of using glutamine supplementation. Glutomine is a common misspelling of glutamine.
  • Guanfacine ER
    Guanfacine ER is a medication that helps treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). This eMedTV article takes an in-depth look at this prescription drug, including information on safety concerns, dosing guidelines, and side effects.
  • Guanfacine ER Dosage
    When used to treat ADHD, most children start with a guanfacine ER dosage of 1 mg per day. As this eMedTV page explains, the amount may be increased gradually, if necessary. This Web page takes a closer look at dosing guidelines for this ADHD medication.
  • Guanfacine ER Drug Information
    This eMedTV Web presentation looks at the prescription medicine guanfacine ER. Information includes its uses, dosing, side effects, warnings, and precautions.
  • Haliperidol
    Haloperidol is a drug used to treat several conditions, such as psychotic disorders and behavior problems. This eMedTV page explains how the drug works and lists factors that may affect your dose. Haliperidol is a common misspelling of haloperidol.
  • Haloperidol
    Haloperidol is a prescription medication that is used to treat psychotic disorders and behavior problems. This eMedTV resource offers an overview of haloperidol, including information on its uses, dosing guidelines, and possible side effects.
  • Haloperidol (Haldol) Drug Information
    This eMedTV article gives some basic information on haloperidol (Haldol), a prescription drug used to treat schizophrenia and other conditions. This page also gives guidelines on what to discuss with your healthcare provider before starting treatment.
  • Haloperidol Dosing
    As this eMedTV page explains, haloperidol dosing usually starts at 3 mg to 5 mg two to three times daily for adults with severe symptoms. This page lists factors that can affect the dosage your doctor prescribes, as well as tips on taking the drug.
  • Have a Heart
    Drinking a lot over a long period of time or drinking too much on a single occasion can put your heart at risk. We know moderate amounts of alcohol can protect some from the risks of coronary artery disease but you need to be aware of the limits. Long-term heavy drinking weakens the heart muscle and as a result your heart cannot pump enough blood to sufficiently nourish the organs in your body. Symptoms commonly associated with this include shortness of breath, fatigue, swollen legs and feet, and irregular heartbeat. If you are experiencing any of these you should consult your physician immediately. Make sure you are honest with your doctor about your alcohol consumption.
  • How Long Does Methadone Stay in Your System?
    Methadone can stay in your system from anywhere from 8 to 59 hours. This eMedTV Web resource further discusses the half-life of methadone and explains how this drug can accumulate in the liver and be slowly released from the body.
  • How to Take Chasteberry (Vitex)?
    As this eMedTV page explains, it is a good idea to follow the instructions on the label of your particular chasteberry product. This page further explains how chasteberry (vitex) is taken and discusses why there is no standard dosage of this supplement.
  • How to Use Nicotine Patches
    Apply one nicotine patch directly to the skin every 24 hours. This page from the eMedTV Web site further discusses how to use nicotine patches, including important safety tips on this smoking-cessation drug. A link to more details is also provided.
  • Iloperidone
    Iloperidone is a medication approved to treat schizophrenia. This article from the eMedTV Web library provides a complete overview of the drug, including information on how this antipsychotic medicine works, dosing guidelines, side effects, and more.
  • Iloperidone Dosage
    For people with schizophrenia, the recommended starting dosage of iloperidone is 1 mg twice daily. This eMedTV page outlines some of the factors that may affect your dose and explains why the dosage is slowly increased over a period of several days.
  • Iloperidone Drug Information
    This eMedTV article gives some basic information on iloperidone, a prescription drug that is approved to treat schizophrenia. This Web page also gives guidelines on what to discuss with your healthcare provider before starting treatment.
  • Imipramine
    The antidepressant imipramine comes in two forms -- imipramine hydrochloride and imipramine pamoate. This eMedTV article discusses the differences between the two products and explains what the drugs are used for.
  • Imipramine (Tofranil, Tofranil PM)
    This eMedTV article gives an overview of the antidepressant imipramine (Tofranil, Tofranil PM). This resource explores what the different versions of the drug are used for and includes a link to more in-depth information.
  • Imipramine Alternatives
    This eMedTV page provides an overview of imipramine alternatives for the treatment of depression. Some of these alternatives include other antidepressants (such as Prozac), "talk therapy," electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), and alternative therapies.
  • Imipramine and Breastfeeding
    Breastfeeding while taking imipramine can cause low amounts of the drug to be passed to the nursing baby. This eMedTV article discusses research findings on imipramine and breastfeeding, and explains the possible risks involved.
  • Imipramine and Dry Mouth
    Dry mouth is a common side effect of imipramine. This section of the eMedTV Web site discusses imipramine and dry mouth in more detail, offers tips for dry mouth relief, and explains what your doctor may recommend if dry mouth doesn't improve.
  • Imipramine and Pregnancy
    This eMedTV Web page explains that if you're taking imipramine and pregnancy occurs, you should let your doctor know. A pregnant woman may take imipramine if its benefits to her and the fetus outweigh the possible risks.
  • Imipramine and Suicide
    As with all antidepressants, there may be an increased risk of suicidal behavior while taking imipramine. This eMedTV page discusses imipramine and suicide in more detail and contains a list of possible signs of suicidal behavior to look out for.
  • Imipramine and Weight Gain
    Weight gain may potentially occur with the use of imipramine. This eMedTV Web page discusses imipramine and weight gain in more detail and lists common lifestyle changes that your doctor may recommend to help with any weight gain.
  • Imipramine Overdose
    This eMedTV Web page lists imipramine overdose symptoms (such as vomiting and blue skin) and treatment options (including fluids through an IV) -- and explains that you should seek immediate medical attention if you have overdosed on imipramine.
  • Imipramine Sexual Side Effects
    Sexual side effects of imipramine may include changes in libido and impotence. This part of the eMedTV archives describes these imipramine sexual side effects in more detail and discusses what your doctor may recommend if they occur.
  • Imipramine Withdrawal
    Symptoms of imipramine withdrawal may include headaches, nausea, and malaise. As this eMedTV segment explains, if you are discontinuing this drug, your healthcare provider may wean you off of it slowly to help prevent withdrawals.
  • Imiprimine
    Imipramine is a prescription drug that is used to treat depression in adults. As this eMedTV page explains, it is available as two different products -- imipramine hydrochloride and imipramine pamoate. Imiprimine is a common misspelling of imipramine.
  • Important Things to Know About Nicotine Inhaler
    This portion of the eMedTV Web site talks about the nicotine inhaler, including several important things to know before starting treatment. This article explains how the inhaler compares to other nicotine products and provides a link to more information.
  • Impramine
    This eMedTV article explains that imipramine is a tricyclic antidepressant that is available in two different products. This page discusses some of the differences between these two products. Impramine is a common misspelling of imipramine.
  • Information About Manic Depression
    This eMedTV selection discusses manic depression, a long-term brain disorder that involves episodes of mania and depression. Characteristic symptoms are discussed in this brief overview, and a link to more information about manic depression is provided.
  • Information About Perphenazine
    This eMedTV segment gives some basic information about perphenazine, which is used to treat schizophrenia and other conditions. It explains how it works, possible side effects, and more. Also included is a link to more detailed information.
  • Information About Prolixin
    Prolixin is prescribed to treat schizophrenia and other conditions. This eMedTV Web page offers some helpful information about Prolixin, including details on available forms and what to discuss with your healthcare provider.
  • Information on ADD
    Are you looking for information on ADD? This page of the eMedTV archives presents a list of common symptoms, describes the complications this condition may lead to, and includes a link to a full-length article on this topic.
  • Information on Loxapine
    This eMedTV Web page takes a brief look at loxapine. It includes information on what this drug is used for, how it works, and what you need to discuss with your healthcare provider before taking it, with links to learn even more.
  • Information on PDD
    This eMedTV resource contains helpful information on pervasive development disorder (PDD), an umbrella term that refers to conditions characterized by a delay in social and communication skills. Also included in this article is a link to more details.
  • Inosital
    Inositol is a dietary supplement that is claimed to be useful for treating various conditions. This eMedTV article discusses other possible benefits and explores the effectiveness of this product. Inosital is a common misspelling of inositol.
  • More About Inositol
    Inositol is a dietary supplement used to treat a variety of different conditions. This eMedTV Web page explores various inositol uses, discusses the safety and effectiveness of the supplement, and describes potential side effects that may occur.
  • Inositol and Breastfeeding
    It may not be safe to take inositol supplements while breastfeeding. This page on the eMedTV site offers a more in-depth look at inositol and breastfeeding, including information on whether the naturally occurring molecule passes through breast milk.
  • Inositol and Pregnancy
    There is not enough information available to recommend inositol supplements for pregnant women. This eMedTV page includes more information about inositol and pregnancy, and discusses the potential risks of using the supplement while pregnant.
  • Inositol Benefits
    Inositol is claimed to be useful for many purposes, but none of these are supported by scientific evidence. This eMedTV segment discusses some of the supposed benefits of inositol and explains whether the supplement should be used in children.
  • Inositol Dosage
    An effective and safe inositol dosage has not been established at this time. This part of the eMedTV Web site explains what inositol doses are commonly used in clinical studies and offers other important dosing information for the dietary supplement.
  • Inositol Drug Interactions
    Divalproex, valproic acid, and lithium are some of the medicines that may interact with inositol. This eMedTV Web page lists specific products that may cause inositol drug interactions and describes the potential problems that may occur.
  • Inositol Overdose
    Nausea and vomiting may occur as a result of an inositol overdose. As this eMedTV page explains, however, very little is known about the possible effects of an inositol overdose, and it is not known if an overdose of the supplement is even possible.
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